run hunted
run hunted
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The Ponte Vecchio: is a Medieval stone closed-spandrel segmental arch bridge over the Arno River, in Florence, Italy, noted for still having shops built along it, as was once common. Butchers initially occupied the shops; the present tenants are jewellers, art dealers and souvenir sellers. The Ponte Vecchio’s two neighbouring bridges are the Ponte Santa Trinita and the Ponte alle Grazie.
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David (Michaelangelo): David is a masterpiece of Renaissance sculpture created between 1501 and 1504, by the Italian artist Michelangelo. It is a 5.17-metre marble statue of a standing male nude. The statue represents the Biblical hero David, a favoured subject in the art of Florence. Originally commissioned as one of a series of statues of prophets to be positioned along the roofline of the east end of Florence Cathedral, the statue was instead placed in a public square, outside the Palazzo della Signoria, the seat of civic government in Florence, where it was unveiled on 8 September 1504.
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Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
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Gondola Ride: Venice, Italy.
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The Bridge of Sighs: is a bridge located in Venice, northern Italy. The enclosed bridge is made of white limestone and has windows with stone bars. It passes over the Rio di Palazzo and connects the New Prison to the interrogation rooms in the Doge’s Palace. It was designed by Antoni Contino and was built in 1602.
The view from the Bridge of Sighs was the last view of Venice that convicts saw before their imprisonment. The bridge name, given by Lord Byron in the 19th century, comes from the suggestion that prisoners would sigh at their final view of beautiful Venice through the window before being taken down to their cells. 
A local legend says that lovers will be granted eternal love and bliss if they kiss on a gondola at sunset under the Bridge of Sighs as the bells of St Mark’s Campanile toll.
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Monaco: is a sovereign city-state, located on the French Riviera in Western Europe. Bordered by France on three sides, one side borders the Mediterranean Sea.
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Gothic Quarter, Barcelona: It’s a bit misleading to call it just the Gothic Quarter. You can see remains from all the way back to the Roman days, as well as modernist touches here and there. It’s really layers upon layers of different eras, and you pretty much always turn the corner and find something fascinating.
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Barcelona, Spain: The Sagrada Familia temple is an incredibly vast and intricate piece of architecture you won’t want to miss – there’s literally nothing like it. The Spanish Village features unique craft shops and you can catch a famous flamenco show there as well.
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Nouvelle Eve Cabaret Show: A traditional French Cabaret in Paris. It offers a diverse range of entertainment from your cancan dancers, to trapeze artists and acrobats with a few laughs and crowd participation thrown in. It is entertaining for both girls and guys and a perfect way to start a Parisian evening
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Château Versailles: When the château was built, Versailles was a country village; today, however, it is a wealthy suburb of Paris, some 20 kilometres southwest of the French capital. The court of Versailles was the centre of political power in France from 1682, when Louis XIV moved from Paris, until the royal family was forced to return to the capital in October 1789 after the beginning of the French Revolution. Versailles is therefore famous not only as a building, but as a symbol of the system of absolute monarchy of the Ancien Régime.